screen shot of cronometer app dashboard

Wine for a Macro Epiphany

Those who have been reading for a while know that I’m a workout fanatic. In fact, I’m loving it so much that I’m in the midst of obtaining my Certification in Personal Training from the National Academy of Sports Medicine. But, that is a story for another post. Today, I want to talk macros (again!).

In January, I entered a fitness challenge at Athletic Apex in Syracuse, New York, which came with it three personal training sessions, as well as a couple of assessments designed to optimize my training and determine the best workout and nutrition plan for me. One of the assessments was the RMR, which determined my resting metabolic rate and, in turn, was used to help devise my ideal daily caloric intake and macronutrient breakdown – in other words, how many grams of protein, carbohydrates and fats I should consume each day.

I started with the goal of building muscle and gaining weight, something that I’ve struggled with for years. I was excited to get a real formula based on science and not just gut (no pun intended!). My total calories were set at 2,100, which was lower than I had been at on my own. I averaged 2,200 to 2,400 and was struggling to gain anything. I was a bit skeptical about going down but then wondered if maybe I was eating too much of the wrong foods or something. So, I gave it shot.

Initially, it was great for me. I gained muscle in a way I never had before, while reducing body fat. I put on two pounds. But, then, the progress stopped. I increased my calories by 200 to see what would happen. Nothing. Then, I decided to move the macros around. Still nothing. The whole time I was progressively lifting heavy, following the BUILD 1.0 program. Now, I realize I had two variables going on – the new fitness program and playing around with the macro ratios but still!

Fast forward to earlier this week when I saw a mention of the Cronometer app in a workout group of which I’m a part. The person said they felt it was more accurate than MyFitnessPal for tracking nutrition. So, I figured I’d give it a shot. My first impression was that it was a pretty basic app and it wasn’t pretty or organized well at all. It was an endless list of what I was eating and it wasn’t grouped together and there wasn’t a lot of white space with the design. BUT, once you get passed all that? There is one key difference that is completely changing my life. MyFitnessPal never truly synced to my Apple Watch. But Cronometer does. So much, in fact, that my daily calorie needs adjust as the day goes on and I burn more calories. I am realizing just how many more I need based on my activity. I consumed nearly 2,500 calories the other day, for example, and yesterday just more than 2,400. Today, 2,234 is my current goal, but I imagine it will go up as the day goes on, especially if I go for a walk at lunch.

So, there you go. Science can only take you so far. While my RMR may have been accurate, the data was not enough to account for my energy usage all day long, particularly since my metabolism may run a bit faster than average. I weighed myself last night and was at 100.3 pounds for the first time since I was pregnant! Now, a female’s weight fluctuates daily, for better or worse, so I’m going to check again in a week, but my scale indicates body fat and muscle mass percentages, too. The trend is going up for muscle mass and body fat is about the same. So, those are all good signs.

The whole time I’ve been experimenting with all this, I’ve cut way down on my alcohol consumption. A couple glasses a week is now my new normal. So, that also could be helping as alcohol is not the greatest when it comes to getting good sleep and it can interfere with metabolization of key nutrients, too. This past weekend was the exception. I celebrated the first full gorgeous weekend in Central New York with a $5 Sauvignon Blanc from Frontera in Chile, as well as Clean Slate Riesling, an old standby. Life was good in the sun all weekend! Cheers to many more as we dive into summer!

Wine for a Cheer Road Trip

As our first all-star cheerleading season comes to an end this week with a trip to the Platinum Nationals in Rochester, New York, I thought I’d tell you a little bit about our recent road trip to Erie, Pennsylvania for the
Lake Erie Cheer and Dance National Championships.

Our Little Winds are a mini-prep team; nearly all the girls are in their first year and it’s been a learning experience for the 6 to 9-year-olds. This was the first time we traveled this far from home for a competition and they were so excited to stay in a hotel! Plus, one of the girls on the team celebrated her 8th birthday and we had the opportunity to have lunch and cake together as a team with her.

I absolutely hate driving. I don’t mind long car rides but I really dislike being the driver. So, this trip was about three hours and 45 minutes and, man, it felt like forever — that is until I started to see an exciting sight out my windows. On either side of New York State Thruway were vineyards are far as the eye could see. It was almost like seeing cornfields spread out for miles but it was grapes. Now, the grapes are still dormant in Upstate New York but my mind could imagine how beautiful this sight would be come later spring and through summer and fall.

When I first spotted the grapevines, I was curious. What winemaking region is this? Part of Niagara? Something else? Then, I told myself maybe it was where grapes are mostly grown to make jelly and jam. I could not have been more incorrect. It turns out we were driving through Lake Erie Wine Country, the largest grape-growing region east of the Rockies. It extends roughly 50 miles from Chautauqua County in New York to Erie County in Pennsylvania. The farther we drove, the more vineyards we saw until we started to see many blue signs noting the names of the different wineries we could visit.

I made a mental note to stop on the way home and see what this region is all about. Since we left Sunday morning, many of the wineries in Pennsylvania were not open but just outside of Fredonia, New York, we stumbled upon Liberty Vineyards and Winery in Sheridan, New York. After a warm welcome from one of the owners, my daughter and I surveyed the scene. They were having an Easter-themed tasting complete with wines paired with Peeps, dark chocolate and milk chocolate eggs and jelly beans. I was mainly interested in what they were known for and wanted to taste the wine not the candy! But, they were smart and provided the candy to my 9-year-old along with a bottle of grape juice!

I tried wines from various profiles, including a Pinot Grigio, Riesling, Diamond Select, Red Blend, Fredonia and Sparkling Riesling. My favorites were the Diamond and Fredonia, which I could imagine having with dark chocolate, pizza or a burger. In addition, I tried their best-selling Reds, Whites & Blues, which is a sweet rose they use in their popular sangria recipe.

We left with seven bottles of wine for about $100, as well as a fun bottle stopper we won after Lucia chose a plastic egg from the basket. We also learned enough about the region for me to want to make another trip back with my husband. It looks like there is a lot to see and taste in this area, which to me is a well-kept wine secret in New York State!

Oh, and about that cheer competition? Those Little Winds won the national championship! Their winning routine is below:

CNY Storm Little Winds gave a flawless performance to become national champions in their class at the Lake Erie Cheer and Dance National Championships April 6.
cloudy scene with snow covered trees

Wine for the Annual Slump

It’s just past the Ides of March, the time of year when inevitably, no matter what is happening in my life, I hit the biggest slump. I don’t really know why. Sometimes I think it might be the time change; Daylight Saving Time is usually just before the middle of March. Other times I blame it on the weather; it’s usually still winter and gray and cold but with a few 50-degree days thrown in to remind us that spring is coming. Whatever the reason, I’m grouchy, groggy and listless.

I’m not sure there is a wine on earth that can help when you’re feeling exhausted, bored and drained. It’s hard to know what to do other than to put one foot in front of the other and try to stay motivated. I also am trying to get enough sleep, though the past few nights I’ve actually gone to bed later than usual, which isn’t helping. At any rate, I am trying to stay on my game and motivated despite the lack of energy. Here are my top 5 tips on how to survive a slump:

  1. Recommit to your New Year’s resolutions. By now, if I’m being honest, some of my resolutions have gone by the wayside. One way that I recharge my batteries is to review my progress and step up my game, if needed. For example, one of my resolutions was to read the Bible and I realized I haven’t been reading a chapter a night as I intended. I went all in and joined a Bible study at my church. Now, I have a game plan and a new way to understand how to read the Bible, which is reinvigorating that resolution for me.
  2. Read a few great books. I love to read. I always have. When I’m feeling lethargic, there is nothing better than curling up on the couch with a blanket and a good book.
  3. Give yourself a new goal. If you need motivating, set a new goal for yourself. You can reach for a new personal record at the gym or start training for a 5K. If there is a hobby you’ve wanted to explore or skill you’ve always wanted to master, do that. Find something toward which you can work.
  4. Clean out. Start your spring cleaning a little early. It helps to reduce the clutter in your life physically, so you can feel spiritually cleansed, too. I’ve seen a meme floating around social media about getting rid of 40 items during the 40 days of Lent. It’s a great way to get started.
  5. Start planning summer camps and vacations. Looking ahead to summer is great way to beat the blues of mid-March. Begin to plan your kids’ summer camp schedules or your family vacation. Thinking about warmer weather just might kick you into a higher gear.

As I mentioned earlier, wine typically makes me more sluggish and relaxed, not more energetic! But, I suppose if you’re in a slump, trying something new is one way to beat it. For #WineWednesday this week, I’m planning to try a Chardonnay/Riesling from Salmon Run, one of Dr. Konstantin Frank’s from New York State’s Finger Lakes region. It sounded interesting to cross the two grapes together. It’s not the riskiest move in terms of trying a new wine but it’s new to me! Maybe, it will remind me of warmer days driving through the vineyards along Seneca Lake without a care in the world! Cheers!

coffee cup, laptop, phone, notebook and pen neatly on a desk

Wine for Being Organized

Those who know me well know that I’m extremely organized. At home and at work, I’m usually the one with all her ducks in a row. I truly believe this is the only way I can juggle being a wife, mom, manager, professor, friend and colleague. Since the New Year is really right around the corner, I’m reminded that for many, it’s a time to renew commitments to being organized. For others, it’s a time to make positive changes and sometimes that means figuring out how those changes integrate into daily life. This post will lay out some of the many things I do to keep myself organized day to day.

  1. Google/Outlook Calendars – I use both. Google is my personal calendar, which I share with my husband. It’s color coded by family member to help easily see what’s what. The minute an event or deadline or appointment is set, it goes on the calendar. This way, it reduces the chances of it getting missed. Outlook is the one I use at work. I put all my meetings on it, as well as time out of the office, plus my class times are included. I am careful always to mark down my busy time so people can’t schedule meetings during those times.
  2. Daily Planner – I have a daily planner where I keep lists of all that needs to get done. There are four main sections – workouts, personal items and appointments and work task list. In 2018, I used the Catholic Daily Planner and I enjoyed the layout so much that I ordered another, larger size for 2019. Some people use bullet journals, while others just keep lists. Whatever works for you, I highly encourage. For me, the workouts help me not only keep track of the days I lift but also how much I’m lifting so I continue to progress. I don’t keep track of my nutrition here since I use MyFitnessPal for that but there’s just something about writing down the workouts! I also love the calendar feature that allows me to list all the important activities for the week. I mostly end up putting the personal stuff on there just to keep me sane on that front! I include piano, swim, cheer, field hockey, even Mass on there!
  3. Meal Planning – I do my grocery shopping every Saturday morning. Friday night or Saturday morning, I plan out dinners for the week and write down all that I need to buy. I try to go through the freezer and pantry to use what we have as much as possible but, I admit, I sometimes fall down there! But, planning it all out helps save money and time. If the recipes are online, the links go right into our shared Google Calendar, otherwise the book and page number are listed. I post the dinner menu on the fridge so everyone knows that to expect.
  4. Nighttime Routine – Every evening, I take the time to plan for the next morning. I fill my shaker bottles and set up my gym bag and clothes, set out my clothes for the next morning, get my work bag packed and set out anything else that needs to be ready to go. I make the kids lunches and put the cold stuff in the fridge for them. They assemble them on their own each morning. I lay out Christopher’s clothes for him and he dresses himself. I try to set things up so the kids can be responsible individually for their own stuff to the extent they can. Having everything ready like that is a huge help in the morning and the only way I can get out the door timely.
  5. Do things the minute you think of them or write it down – I try to just handle things as they come to me or write it down immediately so I can’t forget. If I remember I need to write a check for the piano teacher, I stop and do it, or I make a note or set an alarm. I look at mail the minute it comes in or I get home and review it. I write things down at work as I think of things I need to do.
  6. Neat and tidy – I am as neat as I can be. I have a few spots in the house that are not as neat and organized (my closet, for one), but for the most part everything has a place and I try to keep things organized. It’s helpful for me to know where things are and to be surrounding by neat rather than chaos. Sure, sometimes things get away from me but our house and my office are generally tidy with things put away or stacked neatly. Now that I have two weeks off between Christmas and New Year’s, I use the time to clean out closets and the kids’ rooms, etc. in preparation for the new year. Spring/summer is another key clean out time. Other than that, we just try to keep up throughout the year.

When I’m cleaning my house, I love to sip wine. Something easy drinking that can stand on its own works best since I am likely not also snacking or dining while cleaning! One can only multitask so much! I would recommend a fruity Cabernet, semi-dry Riesling or even a sparkly Cava or Prosecco to celebrate your newfound organization skills! Cheers!

 

maria, lucia and christopher in the swimming pool

Wine for Hot Summer Days

It’s been a hot last few days in Central New York, much hotter than we are used to. The thermometer rarely goes above 90 during a normal summer but so far, we’ve hit and/or surpassed it a few times and it’s only July 3! Typically when it’s this hot, I avoid drinking too much alcohol due to dehydration and just because it makes me feel like garbage when it’s so hot. But, this past weekend, I had some fun loading up the coolers for a graduation party to celebrate my husband’s graduate degree.

The first stop was Harbor View Wines and Liquors where I purchased a case of 12 bottles at a 20 percent discount. I chose wines from all over the world, including Germany, New Zealand, Portugal, Argentina and Italy. In addition, my picks included a couple from the Finger Lakes Region of New York State, as well as Washington and California. I tried to vary the types of wines, choosing six reds and six whites, as well as different grapes. I figured it would be fun to have a hodgepodge available to guests or for us after the party ends!

I did the same thing with the beer selection. I chose a Mexican sampler, Saranac Summer Series, Blue Moon, Labatt Blue Light and some White Claw sparklers. Of course, there was plenty of water and sparkling water for guests, too. The most popular beers were the Mexican ones, followed closely by Saranac and Labatt Blue Light. We had one Saranac left and a few Blue Moons. As for wine? I enjoyed Goose Watch Vineyard’s Diamond white, which is made with the Diamond white grape, one of the originals grown in Upstate New York.

I think it’s fun to try a whole bunch of different types of wines and beers. There are so many in this world and I probably will never try them all. That’s why, when I have an opportunity to purchase a lot, I take it; your guests will have their choice and you’ll hopefully have something for everyone’s taste.

Summer Wine Choices

Overall in the summer, I enjoy white and rose wine over a red, simply because they are more refreshing to me. I typically have them at a slightly cooler temperature than I would a red so that may be one reason why. I don’t like an overly sweet wine. You’ll see me drinking a Sauvignon Blanc or a Cayuga White. Riesling is a popular choice, as well, especially with company, and White Merlot is a great standby, particularly with barbecue. Below are some of the ones I chose for our outdoor party.

Diamond
Goose Watch Winery
Finger Lakes, New York

Riesling
Clean Slate
Mosel, Germany

Sauvignon Blanc
The Crossings
New Zealand

White Merlot
Beringer
Napa Valley, California

Chardonnay
Bread and Butter Wines
California

I’ll add to this list, as I try more delicious summer wines. Please share your favorites below!

 

newspapers stacked on a table

Wine for Changing Times

Over the past 24 hours there have been two things that have made me pause to think about how much has changed with the world in my lifetime. Things that never changed for my grandparents for decades have changed within years for me.

For example, yesterday Sears announced it would close 72 stores, including one that anchored a suburban shopping mall near where I live. As the director of media relations for Syracuse University’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management, of course I facilitated interviews for local media with one of our professors who is expert in the field of supply chain and retail. As he explained Sears’ demise, he harkened back to the way it used to be. Sears was “the Amazon of its time,” he said in one interview. Wow. The Amazon of its time? But, yeah, think about it.

People ordered EVERYTHING from their Sears catalogs starting in the 1800s. Houses, cars, tools, farm supplies, clothing, you name it. Kind of like how we interact with the Amazon giant today. But, even when I was a kid, I remember Sears being the place my parents bought so many things from appliances to clothing to tools. We were in there all the time. We even used to have our cars repaired there or tires put on. So many things from just that one store.

The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. I have a refrigerator and stove from Sears and possibly our washer/dryer, too, although they were a housewarming gift. What’s more? I actually visited a Sears store a few weeks ago to purchase a First Communion dress for my daughter. In fact, I am a big fan of Sears for children’s dress clothes. It’s the only place I’ve ever been able to find a suit that fits Christopher well and looks appropriate for Easter Mass.

This morning, on the way home from the gym, Big D and Bubba, a country radio show, based in Nashville, Tennessee, discussed another thing of the past – paper boys. One of the DJ’s explained that his teenaged son was up early and saw a car driving very slowly, then stopping, then driving then stopping. He was concerned and asked what the car could possibly be doing. His father, said, “Delivering the newspaper.” The son had NO idea that was a “thing.”

It was a “thing.” I remember receiving two newspapers a day – one in the morning, the Post-Standard, and one in the evening, the Herald-Journal. The Herald-American came on Sundays. We got them all at my house and I read them religiously. It’s where we got all our news. There was no internet (yes, I was alive when there was no internet).

What’s more, there was a newspaper delivery person, usually a boy but it could also be a girl, who delivered the newspapers to special plastic boxes hanging under mailboxes, because you couldn’t put the newspaper in the mailbox. It used to be the job of one of the kids in my house to go “get the paper.” The delivery person, who we called the “paper boy,” since it was always a boy in my experience, also came weekly to collect payment for the papers. He’d ring the doorbell and say “Collecting!” It was a huge treat as a kid to be able to give him the money and get the tiny stamp-like receipt in return.

Nowadays the paper still comes, but only a few times a week, plus Sundays. And you pay online, not in person at your front door. In my lifetime, I’m watching print newspapers all but disappear. But in my grandparent’s lifetime, all they knew was newspapers. Imagine that pace of change exponentially accelerating as the years go by.

Anyway, it made me nostalgic for the way things used to be. I mean, there was an extra side job for a kid, delivering papers, that doesn’t exist anymore. They even got tipped when they came to collect! The responsibility that bred in young people was so valuable to them. Nowadays, I find it difficult to find a teenaged babysitter who is willing to and responsible enough for the job. What we had as responsibilities as teens in the 1980s is so different from what the teens have now.

It’s fascinating to see change happen before your eyes and valuable to look back and think about the past. Wine is a great way to sit back and ruminate on days gone by. I think a good choice is what we enjoyed on Memorial Day, Clean Slate Riesling. It’s an old standby and a traditional Riesling, but it allows you to start again or think anew. Best of both worlds.

What do you remember from your past? Comment below and cheers!

maria, lucia and christopher smiling and eating ice cream

Wine for “Almost” Spring/Summer

I’m on a roll now! The weather turned gorgeous this week. I’m feeling a bit more like myself. In this post, a short one for #WineWednesday, I wanted to share my top 5 spring/summer wine choices. Cheers!

  1. Sauvignon Blanc – I enjoy those from New Zealand, although I have enjoyed a few from other regions, as well.
  2. Chablis – I seldom write about this one because it’s rare that I find a good bottle but when I do, wow! I forget how much I love it. My favorite pairing for Chablis is sushi.
  3. White merlot – This one is often overlooked but very enjoyable particularly if you have guests who are not used to drinking wine. It’s essentially a blush, which has wider appeal.
  4. Riesling – Of all the whites, this one is my favorite. I love the German Rieslings and those inspired by that region, particularly the Mosel/Saar River area. Try Hermann J. Weimer from the Finger Lakes region in New York state..
  5. Red blend – Red blends tend to be easy-drinking and often fruit forward, making them ideal for nights by the campfire. You can find inexpensive ones at most local liquor stores, including Lucas Vineyards Tugboat Red and Red Truck wine. Any red blend will do!
  6. BONUS: Champagne/Prosecco – Who doesn’t love a good bottle of bubbly? It makes any ordinary day/evening a real treat!

What are some of your favorite summer wines? Comment below! I love new ideas!

summer-riesling

Wine for Summer Days

Sunday afternoon the kids and I went blueberry picking at Emmi Farms in Baldwinsville, New York. We had a lot of fun and it was an adventure to drive down into the field to pick. The prices were more than reasonable and we were able to grab the first corn of the season, too. Yum!

blueberries-kidsAfter that, we decided to take a drive to Camillus, New York to check out a new retailer, Vine and Barrel, about which I had heard so many good things. Well, despite the nearly 30 five-star reviews on its Facebook page, my experience was less than desirable.

First of all, we walked in to see about five store clerks milling about, two of which were behind a large tasting bar. But despite the bar set-up there was nothing out for tasting. It was approximately 2:45 p.m. on a Sunday so I would have expected something. Usually, when stores have tasting bars, there is something set up. One of the ladies said hello in a noncommittal way. My daughter and I were the only ones in the store.

We went back to the fine wine room to check out the selection, which I had heard was unique. No one followed us. No one asked us if they could help us find anything. I was shocked. We meandered through the rest of the shop looking at the selection. Although they were touted as having the largest selection of New York wines, I didn’t find it to be any different from some of the other local shops.

We selected a Riesling from the Mosel region of Germany, a Malbec from Argentina and a $30 bottle of Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley in Oregon, as our splurge wine.

The Riesling was excellent and went well with our salmon and fresh corn for dinner. But honestly, I won’t be back to Vine and Barrel. It just wasn’t a pleasant atmosphere to be completely ignored. Oh, and whatever was going on with the intermittent loud 1970s rock music was quite distracting while we shopped. I definitely did not have the same experience as so many who sang its praises.

What’s more, I feel like it needs to grow into its space a bit more. It was cavernous in there and not at all homey and welcoming as I would expect a home-town wine retailer to be. At least we enjoyed our summer Riesling!

wine-barrels

Wine Review: Shelburne Vineyard

Earlier this week, I shared a review of Elfs Farm Winery and Cider House, located in Plattsburgh, New York. I didn’t want to neglect Vermont, so we also stopped at Shelburne Vineyard in Shelburne, Vermont while on our trip. My review follows.

The story of Shelburne Vineyard goes back 35 years but the first vintage was not released until 2000, so it’s a relatively young winery. Growing hardy grapes that work best in cool climates, much like Elfs Farm, the vineyard’s main vintage includes Marquette, Minnesota hybrids and a bit of Riesling and Vidal Blanc.

shelburne-tasting
The tasting list at Shelburne Vineyards features whites, as well as reds. A “barrel thief” is a member of their wine club.

The wines were crisp and clean overall. I enjoyed the whites much more than the reds, but that’s normal for me. I am not a huge fan of red varietals in this part of the country. They are too “dirty” tasting for me. My favorite wine, and one of the bottles we purchased, was the 2016 Louise Swenson dry white. While I enjoyed most of the whites, this one was unique, made from the grape of the same name grown at the vineyard.

My husband enjoyed one of the rose wines, the 2016 Whimsey Meadow Dry Rose, which is named after a meadow just down the road at Shelburne Farms. We actually had just finished hiking it prior to stopping at the winery! While the dryness surprised me, and not in a positive way (I wanted it to be less dry), that’s exactly what my husband liked about it. We purchased a bottle of that, too.

The winery itself has a gorgeous tasting room with floor to ceiling windows overlooking one of the vineyards. Live music is often featured and there is also a patio and mezzanine with tables and chairs for people to sit, chat and enjoy the wine. It was a pleasant, friendly experience all around. We’re glad we stopped!

Back to the Whimsey Meadow for a minute, below are some pictures from that hike, as well as a few others from our afternoon at Shelburne Farms, another highly recommended stop, if you travel to Vermont.

 

 

 

 

Wine Review: Elfs Farm Winery and Cider House

Our family just returned from a few days in Northern New York and Vermont for our annual summer vacation. While I used to live in Plattsburgh, New York, the rest of the family was new to the area. Now, when I say I lived there, it was like 20 years ago so a lot had changed in two decades! One of the changes was the new Adirondack Wine Trail, which featured a handful of wineries, established in the last 15 years or so, making cold climate wines with grapes, such as Marquette and Frontenac. Some wineries, such as Elfs Farm Winery and Cider House, are also importing grapes from the Finger Lakes region and making Rieslings and Cayuga White blends.

 

wine-glasses

We stopped at Elfs Farm the first evening we arrived in Plattsburgh, figuring it would be a nice happy hour stop before dinner. We were right. When we pulled up, we were greated by one of the dogs and a puppy, which the kids were excited about. Inside, we found a friendly vineyard owner, who was more than happy to help us explore the wines. She even offered checkers for the kids, as well as crayons and sidewalk chalk! It was a huge help to us that they could keep busy while we tasted.

One of the unique tasting features is the cool wine glass tree they use. Basically, they pour out the five featured wines starting with the first at the bottom and you work your way up to the top. It’s an extra that makes a cute photo op.

We ended up purchasing two of the wines we tried – the Sweet Riesling and Adirondack Red. Since we are not fans of hard cider, we passed on trying those, although, being that it’s located in apple country, that is part of what this vineyard is known for.

On our way out, we were also lucky enough to hear a few dinner recommendations, one of which we took. Our House Bistro in downtown Plattsburgh features all different kinds of macaroni and cheese. Lucia and Christopher opted for the traditional, Maria built her own with cheddar and bacon, Jon had poutine mac and cheese and I had chicken pot pie. Very yummy! The margaritas were excellent, as well!

I definitely recommend a stop at Elf’s Farm if you find yourself just north of the Grand Isle Ferry along route 9 in Plattsburgh; you won’t be disappointed!